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Unit GREEK ANTIQUITIES

Course
Archaeology and history of art
Study-unit Code
GP003435
Curriculum
In all curricula
Teacher
Massimo Nafissi
Teachers
  • Massimo Nafissi - Didattica Ufficiale
Hours
  • 36 ore - Didattica Ufficiale - Massimo Nafissi
CFU
6
Course Regulation
Coorte 2017
Offered
2018/19
Learning activities
Caratterizzante
Area
Storia antica e medievale
Sector
L-ANT/02
Type of study-unit
Type of learning activities
Attività formativa monodisciplinare
Language of instruction
Italian
Contents
The Order of Myth.
Religion, Literary Tradition and Art.
I. Religion, politics and civic and panhellenic pride in the figural decoration of sacred buildings in the archaic and classical age.
- Introduction
- The metopes of the cd. thesauros Heraion of Sele
- The thesauros of the Athenians in Delphi
- The temple of Zeus at Olympia
- The Parthenon
II. Amyclae, its legends and its sanctuaries.
III. The throne of Bathykles in Amyclae. 
Reference texts
Readings
Students who have not taken the exam Storia greca, whether or not attending 60% of lectures, are recommended to read
- M. Bettalli (a cura di), Storia Greca, Carocci, Roma 2013, ch. 7-17.

For students attending more than 60% of lectures
Part I (structured in five sections, A-E, includes sections of an handbook for basic information):
Basic information:
G. Bejor, M. Castoldi, C. Lambrugo, Arte Greca, Milano: Mondadori Università, 2013, 110-9; 127-132; 138-146; 211-229; 271-280.
A paper or book from each section (A-E).
A.
- C. Marconi, The imagery of the archaic Greek temple, RES. Anthropology and Aesthetics 45, 2004, 211-224;
- M. Torelli, Le strategie di Kleitias. Composizione e programma figurativo del vaso François, Electa, Milano 2007;
- T. Hölscher, Architectural Sculpture: Messages? Programs? Towards Rehabilitating the Notion of 'Decoration', in P. Schultz, R.von den Hoff (ed.), Structure, Image, Ornament: Architectural Sculpture in the Greek World. Proceedings of an International Conference Held at the American School of Classical Studies, 27-28 November 2004, Oxford/Oakville, CT: Oxbow Books, 2009, 54-67.
B.
- C. Masseria – M. Torelli, Il mito all'alba di una colonia greca. Il programma figurativo delle metope dell'Heraion alla foce del Sele, in F.H. Massa-Pairault (ed.), Le mythe grec dans l'Italie antique, Actes du colloque international (Rome, 14-16 novembre 1996), MEFRA 1999, 205-262;
- M. Nafissi, I grandi santuari extraurbani: riflessioni sull'Heraion del Sele e sul santuario di Apollo Alaios a Punta Alice, in Problemi della chora coloniale dall'Occidente al Mar Nero, Atti del XL Convegno di Studi sulla Magna Grecia, Taranto 2000, Istituto per la Storia e l'Archeologia della Magna Grecia, Taranto 2001, pp. 267-316;
C.
- C. Marconi, Mito e autorappresentazione nella decorazione figurata dei thesauroi di eta arcaica, in A. Naso, Stranieri e non cittadini nei santuari greci: atti del convegno internazionale, Firenze: Le Monnier università, 2006, 158-186.
- R. von den Hoff, Herakles, Theseus and the Athenian Treasury at Delphi, in P. Schultz, R.von den Hoff (ed.), Structure, Image, Ornament: Architectural Sculpture in the Greek World. Proceedings of an International Conference Held at the American School of Classical Studies, 27-28 November 2004, Oxford/Oakville, CT: Oxbow Books, 2009, 96-104.
D.
- J.M. Barringer, The Temple of Zeus at Olympia, Heroes, and Athletes, in Hesperia 74,2, 2005, 211-241;
- H. Westervelt, Herakles at Olympia: The Sculptural Program of the Temple of Zeus, in P. Schultz, R.von den Hoff (ed.), Structure, Image, Ornament: Architectural Sculpture in the Greek World. Proceedings of an International Conference Held at the American School of Classical Studies, 27-28 November 2004, Oxford/Oakville, CT: Oxbow Books, 2009, 133-152;
- H. Kyrieleis, Pelops, Herakles, Theseus. Zur Interpretation der Skulpturen des Zeustempels von Olympia, in Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archaologischen Instituts, 127-128, 2012-2013, 51-126.
E.
- M. Beard, Il Partenone, Laterza, Roma – Bari 2004;
- L. Beschi, Il fregio del Partenone: una proposta di lettura, in Rendiconti dell’Accademia dei Lincei. Classe di scienze morali, storiche e filologiche 38, 1984, pp. 173-195;
- D. Castriota, Myth, Ethos and Actuality: Official Art in Fifth-century B.C. Athens, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 1992.

Part II
Reading of one of the books listed below is required
- L. Bruit Zaidman - P. Schmitt Pantel, La religione greca, Roma-Bari: Laterza, 1992,
- M. Lupi, Sparta. Storia e rappresentazioni di una città greca, Roma: Carocci, 2017,
- P. Cartledge - A. Spawforth, Hellenistic and Roman Sparta. A tale of two cities, London-New York: Routledge, 1989,
as well as of three among the following papers
• R. Parker, Spartan Religion, in A. Powell (ed.), Classical Sparta: Techniques behind Her Success, London 1989, pp. 142-172 (disponibile anche in traduzione italiana)
• G. Salapata, Myth into Culture: Alexandra/ Kassandra in Lakonia, in V.B. Gorman, E.W. Robinson (eds.), Oikistes. Studies in Constitutions, Colonies, and Military Power in the Ancient World, offered in Honor of A.J. Graham. Mnemosyne Suppl. 234, Leiden 2002, 131-159 (disponibile anche in traduzione italiana)
• M. Nafissi, La stele di Damonon (IG V 1, 213 = Moretti, IAG 16), gli Hekatombaia (Strabo 8,4,11) e il sistema festivo della Laconia d'epoca classica, in F. Berlinzani (a cura di), La cultura a Sparta in età classica, Atti del Seminario di Studi, Università Statale di Milano, 5-6 maggio 2010, Tangram, Trento 2013, pp. 105-174
• N. Richer, La religion des Spartiates. Croyances et cultes dans l'antiquité, Les Belles Lettres, Paris 2012, 343-382.

Part III
Booklet on the lessons, to be issued and uploaded in Unistudium at their end. Optional reading:
A. Faustoferri, Il trono di Amyklai e Sparta. Bathykles al servizio del potere, ESI, Napoli 1996 (chosen sections)

N.B. For students attending less than 60% of lessons the study of
- L. Bruit Zaidman - P. Schmitt Pantel, La religione greca, Laterza, Roma-Bari 1992
- Booklet of the lessons for part III, to be uploaded in Unistudium at the end of the lessons

and, according to their Laurea Magistrale, the following readings are required:

Laurea LM-2
- M. Lupi, Sparta. Storia e rappresentazioni di una città greca, Roma: Carocci, 2017
- at least five contributions from the lists in part I above (choosing one item from each section at least), at least two from the papers in part II, booklet on the lessons for part III.

Laurea LM-15
- M. Lupi, Sparta. Storia e rappresentazioni di una città greca, Roma: Carocci, 2017
- and at least five contributions from the lists above (part I and II) and at least two from the further readings suggested (under the headings “per saperne di più") for part II in Unistudium.

Laurea LM-89
- M. Beard, Il Partenone, Laterza, Roma – Bari 2004,
- the handbook by Bejor et al.,
- and at least other eight contributions among the items listed above for part I. At least a reading from each section A, B, C, D and E must be selected.
Educational objectives
Knowledge and understanding
Greek religion.
Basic knowledge of the Laconian history, and of Laconian and Spartan religion.
The myth in the archaic and classical age in Greek art and literature: myth, religion, politics, society.
Sculpted decoration in Archaic and Classical Greek art (some examples).
Applying knowledge and understanding interdisciplinary approach to the study of Greek culture: analysis and interpretation of literary sources and of architectural monuments and their sculpted decoration as means to reconstruct meaningful cultural messages.
Improvement of the students' skill of historical interpretation of the sources.
Prerequisites
it is useful, but it is not required, to have taken an exam of Greek History and Greek Archaeology.
For students graduating in art history and archeology 12 hours of additional training are activated (see programma esteso: topic I).
Teaching methods
Face to face.
Seminar lessons and/or paper, if requested by the students
Attendance checked by roll call.  Supplementary readings are imposed to students who attend less than 60% of lessons. Attendance by working students is not checked.
Other information
Beginning, schedule an room of the lessons, see Department Official Pages http://www.lettere.unipg.it/didattica/calendari
Learning verification modality
Oral exam (ca. 30', after the course) or, on request of single students, written paper (ca. 10, max. 15 pp.) and/or presentation in seminar on topics regarding the course.
The program is articulated in three main topics (see programma esteso).
Students from the Master's Degrees in Art History or Archaeology can opt for an exam covering only topics I and III. 
Students graduating in Classics can opt for an exam covering only topics II and III.
Extended program
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach. Sources of different nature must be handled, artistic, cultural, political and religious aspects will all be taken into account.

Four Units (I-IV), each of 12 hours, compose the course.
I (= topic I): Myth and figural decoration in archaic and classical sacred buildings. Some examples.
IIa (= topic IIa): Sparta, Laconia and Amyclae. Myth and history.
IIb (= topic IIb): Amyclae, the sanctuary and the cult of Apollo and Hyakinthos. The literary sources.
III (= topic III): The Thron of Apollo at Amyclae.

The course is divided into three main topics.
I. Religion, politics and civic and panhellenic pride in the figural decoration of sacred buildings in the archaic and classical age.
The sculpted figural decorations of several important sacred buildings of the Archaic and Classical period are examined, to provide immediate knowledge of significant monuments of Greek art and to introduce examples for the topic to be discussed in the third part of the course. Among the monuments taken into account are the following:
- The metopes of the cd. thesauros Heraion of Sele
- The thesauros of the Athenians in Delphi
- The temple of Zeus at Olympia
- The Parthenon.
IIa-b. Amyclae, its legends and its sanctuaries.
a. This part of the course discusses the myths centered on Amyclae and its position in the settlement hierarchy and in the political structure of Sparta and Laconia from the Bronze Age to Roman times.
b. The sanctuary of Apollo and Hyakinthos at Amyclae. The ancient sources about the cult will be examined; the course will highlight their chronological depth, their fragmentary nature and the patchy nature of the information. Nevertheless, the general picture of the role of the sanctuary in the life of Sparta and Laconia in Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic-Roman time is clear enough. The sanctuary always played a key role in religious life, but this role was obviously altered by the profound political and institutional changes that affected the region and its relationship with Sparta.
The myth and the cult of Hyakinthos, the young eromenos of Apollo worshiped in the sanctuary together with the god, will be discussed, in the attempt to clarify the meaning within social practices related to pederasty.
III. The throne of Bathykles in Amyclae.
The sanctuary was famous in antiquity particularly for the so-called Bathykles throne. The throne, named after its architect, was a large Late Archaic building of unusual structure, which surrounded an older giant statue of Apollo. A rich figured cycle adorned the throne. Completely lost, its mythical themes are listed quickly, but thoroughly enough, by Pausanias in the second century A.D. We will not neglect the archaeological data, which have dramatically increased over the past ten years, as a result of new researches, but we will especially attempt to propose a comprehensive interpretation of its iconographic program. Its religious content and its references to important notion of Greek archaic ethics warrant a thorough review. To understand the cycle sculpted by Bathycles, however, is necessary to keep in mind the conditions in which Pausanias proposed his exegesis, as well as the whole of our knowledge of the archaic artistic and literary tradition.

Students graduating in Art History or Archaeology can opt for an exam covering only topics I and III.
Students graduating in Classics can opt for an exam covering only topics II and III.

N.B.: The first section has been specially instituted for the students graduating in Art History or Archaeology, but is highly recommended also to the students of Classics.
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